By UPI |

Third round of Democratic debates set for Houston in September

July 10 (UPI) -- The Democratic National Committee has announced the party's third presidential primary debate will be held in Houston for two nights in September.

The debates are set for Sept. 12 and 13 and will be televised by ABC News and Univision.

"We're heading to Houston for the third Democratic presidential primary debate," the party tweeted Tuesday. "Tune in to catch our incredible candidates as they take the stage in Houston."

The party did not announce a location, but potential venues are the University of Houston, Texas Southern University and the George R. Brown Convention Center, ABC News reported.

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"As the nation's most diverse city, Houston is the perfect place for the Democratic Party's third debate," DNC chief Tom Perez said. "Leaders like congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner have been key to making Houston the world-class city it is today."

The DNC has tightened qualifications for the third debate, making it the first to have a potentially paired down field from the 20 candidates that took the stage in Miami last month for the first round of debates. The second is set for July 30 and 31 in Detroit and will be broadcast by CNN.

Party rules say candidates must have at least 2 percent support in four national polls -- or at least that threshold in the early-voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada. Qualifiers must also receive donations from at least 130,000 unique donors in 20 states by Aug. 28.

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One Democrat who will certainly not be in Houston is Eric Swalwell, who dropped out of the race Monday. A day later, San Francisco billionaire Tom Steyer entered the campaign.

Candidates qualified for the first two debates with just 1 percent support or 65,000 unique donors.

2020 election: Democrats running for president debate issues in Miami

Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., are introduced prior to the NBC, MSNBC, Telemundo Democratic Primary Debate in Miami on Thursday. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Appearing on stage for the second night of democratic debates from left to right, author Marianne Williamson, former Gov. John Hickenlooper, businessman Andrew Yang, Buttigieg, Biden, Sanders, Harris, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Sen. Michael Bennett, D-Colo., and Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

The second group of Democratic presidential hopefuls weighed in on a number of issues in their first debate Thursday night, taking aim at President Donald Trump and issues like immigration and healthcare. The debate was moderated by Lester Holt, Savannah Guthrie, Chuck Todd, Rachel Maddow and Jose Diaz-Balart. Photo by Gustavo Cabellero/UPI | License Photo

When the subject turned to immigration, Harris noted that while Biden served in the Obama administration it deported undocumented immigrants that committed no other crimes and pledged that she would reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and extend deferral of deportation for DACA parents and veterans. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Bennet, along with Biden, said the best path to achieving Universal Health Care is following through on the Obama Care model and creating a public option. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Gillibrand said she would continue to invest in border security in a way that focuses on preventing terrorists and traffickers rather than detaining people seeking asylum. "The worst thing President Trump has done is he has taken money away from cross-border terrorism, cross-border human trafficking, drug trafficking and gun trafficking and he's given that money to for-profit prisons," she said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

When asked about college affordability, Buttigieg called for a more limited plan that provides free college for low- and middle-income students. "I think the children of the wealthiest Americans can pay at least a little bit of tuition," he said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Biden (L) is introduced alongside Sanders during the debate. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Biden was the first to evoke Trump's name, saying the president "thinks Wall Street built America. Ordinary middle-class Americans built America." On the subject of immigration, Biden said he would take immediate action to reunite families and would "surge billions of dollars" to areas in Central America where migrants are fleeing to seek asylum. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sanders said Trump is a phony, a pathological liar and a racist that lied during his campaign by failing to "stand up for working families." When the subject turned to healthcare, Sanders said that under his plan Americans will pay more taxes, but will ultimately pay less for healthcare while still receiving more services. "Medicare is the most popular health insurance in the country," he said. "People don't like their private healthcare, they like their doctors and hospitals. Under our plan people go to any hospital they want any doctor they want." Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Yang championed his plan to pay a $1,000 subsidy each month for every American. Yang said this subsidy would increase the quality of American life and decrease the need to spend on issues such as incarceration and homelessness. "This the move that we have to make, particularly as technology is now automating away millions of jobs," said Yang Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

When discussing the migrant crisis at the border, Hickenlooper said he would focus on ensuring that facilities are able to accommodate families to prevent separation and are stocked with food and clothing and have access to medical care. He also called for a reform of Immigration and Customs Enforcement to ensure its agents carry out their jobs in a humanitarian way. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Democratic presidential primary candidates are introduced prior to Wednesday's debate: from left to right, New York Mayor Bill De Blasio, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan; former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro; New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker; Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren; former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke; Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar; Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard; Washington Gov. Jay Inslee; and former Maryland Rep. John Delaney. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Democratic presidential primary candidates stand before moderators on the first night of debates. The debate was moderated by Lester Holt, Savannah Guthrie, Chuck Todd, Rachel Maddow and Jose Diaz-Balart. Photo by Gustavo Cabellero/UPI | License Photo

Another 10 candidates will debate on Thursday at the same venue, the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Miami. Photo by Gustavo Cabellero/UPI | License Photo

When asked about immigration, Booker said he would take immediate action to reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and implement paths to citizenship for those affected as well as those with temporary protected status. Booker was also the only candidate to not raise his hand when asked if they would sign onto the 2015 Iran nuclear deal as originally negotiated, adding however that he believed it was a "mistake" to pull out of the deal. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Castro stressed the importance of repealing section 1325 of the Immigration and Nationality Act and treating crossing the border illegally as a civil violation instead of a criminal one. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

O'Rourke appeared to dodge an early question about whether he would support a 70 percent tax rate on people in the United States making more than $10 million a year, at one point saying in Spanish that the economy must work for all people. However, O'Rourke pledged to shift $5 trillion over the next 10 years to climate issues and pay farmers for environmental services they choose to provide. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

De Blasio stated bluntly that the Democratic Party should favor a 70 percent tax rate on the wealthy, as well as programs such as free college. De Blasio was one of only two candidates to raise his hand when asked if they would abolish their private health insurance in favor of a government-run plan. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Klobuchar, spoke out in favor of a more incremental healthcare plan and implementing a so-called public option. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

link:Ryan: "https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2019/04/04/Ohio-Democrat-Tim-Ryan-joins-2020-race-for-president/9121554391859/"}, called for the United States to remain engaged in global issues such as the war in Afghanistan and keep military forces there until the situation is resolved. "The reality of it is if the United States isn't engaged, the Taliban will grow," he said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Delaney said it is possible to implement carbon pricing, a practice that charges large emitters of carbon dioxide for the negative environmental effects, and pass the funds back to consumers. "You can't put a price on carbon, raise energy prices and not give the money back to the American consumer," he said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Inslee called for the expansion of so-called sanctuary laws that prevent local law enforcement from cooperating with federal immigration authorities and opposed the detainment and separation of children from their families at the border. "There is no reason for the detention and separation of these children. They should be released, pending their hearings and they should have a hearing and the law should be followed," he said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Warren speaks to the media in the spin room after the debate, in which she defended her call for the deconsolidation of large companies, such as Facebook and Amazon, as a tactic to fight corruption and political lobbying. "Where I want to start this is I want to return the government to the people and that means calling out the names of the monopolists and saying I have the courage to go after them," she said. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez speaks to the media prior to the debate. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

A demonstration shows support for GOP President Donald Trump outside the debate venue in Miami. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

A demonstrator stands outside the democratic venue. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Demonstrators show opposition to Democrats. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

A supporter of former Vice President Joe Biden hands out ice cream outside the debate venue. Biden is slated to participate in Thursday's debate. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo